Teaching Reading and Writing: Improving Instruction and Student Achievement 1e

1307946What’s the connection between reading and writing, and how should they be taught—both together and separately? Discover the answers in this cutting-edge research volume, ideal for use as a graduate-level text or a trusted professional reference. Featuring groundbreaking contributions from a who’s who of top-level researchers, this important volume gives educators the foundational knowledge they’ll need to plan and deliver high-quality, evidence-based reading and writing instruction aligned with Common Core State Standards. Educators will fully explore the link between reading and writing, learn how they complement and enhance each other, and discover promising instructional approaches that can strengthen all students’ literacy skills and reduce achievement gaps.

THE LATEST RESEARCH ON:

Integrating reading and writing instruction
Aligning instruction with Common Core State Standards
Effectively translating the results of research studies into everyday practice
Incorporating literacy instruction into academic content areas
Developing a unified assessment model for literacy
Building students’ critical thinking skills
Designing instruction and interventions for English language learners
Creating preservice and inservice programs that help teachers support the reading-writing connection
Using technology to teach—and strengthen—the reading-writing connection

Teaching Reading and Writing: Improving Instruction and Student Achievement 1e
Brett Miller Ph.D. (Editor), Peggy McCardle Ph.D. MPH (Editor), Richard Long Ed.D. (Editor), & Jeb Bush (Foreword)

Publisher: Brookes Publishing; 1 edition (December 18, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1598573640
ISBN-13: 978-1598573640

About the Author

Brett Miller, Ph.D., Program Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), 6100 Executive Boulevard, Suite 4B05, Rockville, Maryland 20852.

Brett Miller oversees the Reading, Writing, and Related Learning Disabilities research portfolio at the National Institutes of Health (NICHD), which focuses on developing and supporting research and training initiatives to increase knowledge relevant to the development of reading and written-language abilities for learners with and without disabilities. Dr. Miller also codirects the Language, Bilingualism, and Biliteracy Research Program, which focuses on language development and psycholinguistics from infancy through early adulthood; bilingualism and/or second-language acquisition; and reading in bilingual and/or English-language-learning children and youth.

Peggy McCardle, Ph.D., M.P.H., Owner, Peggy McCardle Consulting, LLC, 14465 86th Avenue, Seminole, Florida 33776

Peggy McCardle is a private consultant and an affiliated research scientist at Haskins Laboratories. She is the former chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), U.S. National Institutes of Health, where she also directed the Language, Bilingualism, and Biliteracy Research Program and developed various literacy initiatives. Dr. McCardle is a linguist, a former speech-language pathologist, and, in her remote past, a classroom teacher. Her publications address various aspects of public health and developmental psycholinguistics. The recipient of various awards for her work in federal government, including a 2013 NICHD Mentor Award, she also was selected in 2013 to receive the Einstein Award from The Dyslexia Foundation. Her publications address various aspects of public health and developmental psycholinguistics (e.g., language development, bilingualism, reading, learning disabilities). Dr. McCardle has taught scientific and technical writing and has extensive experience developing and coediting volumes and thematic journal issues.

Richard Long, Ed.D., Director of Government Relations for the International Reading Association and Executive Director for Government Relations for the National Title I Association; Washington, DC; rlong@reading.org.
With a doctorate in education counseling from the George Washington University, Dr. Long brings to his work in education and literacy a special interest in policy. He has written on improving literacy education for struggling readers, key issues for improving education reform, as well as the role of the federal government in professional development. In addition, he is writing a book on education policy, The Hidden Cauldron: The Paradox of American Education Reform.

Unber Ahmad, B.S., Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; unber.ahmad@cidd.unc.edu. Ms. Ahmad is conducting assessments and interventions for a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences project devoted to using strategy-based interventions for middle-school students at risk for writing disabilities.

Yusra Ahmed, M.S., Researcher 4, Texas Institute for Measurement Evaluation and Statistics (TIMES), University of Houston; Houston, Texas; Yusra.ahmed@times.uh.edu. Ms. Ahmed is completing her doctoral degree in Developmental Psychology from Florida State University. Her dissertation is a meta-analytic structural equation model of written composition (as measured by curriculum-based, qualitative, and sentence-writing measures) using multiple literacy and language predictors. Other research areas include structural equation models, literacy and language acquisition in typically developing students and students with learning disabilities, identification and classification of learning disabilities, and language development in Spanish-speaking English language learners.

Kim Atwill, Ph.D., Professor, Department of World Languages and Literatures, Portland State University; Portland, Oregon; katwill@pdx.edu. Dr. Atwill is a former classroom teacher. Her current research focuses on the impact of instructional practice on language and literacy development among at-risk learners.

Sara Ballute, M.A., Lead Teacher of Social Studies, High School for Service and Learning at Erasmus Hall; Brooklyn, New York; sballute@schools.nyc.gov. Prior to NYC, Ms. Ballute spent 2 years teaching in Montego Bay, Jamaica. She earned her bachelor’s degree in social studies education from Ithaca College and her master’s degree in anthropology from Hunter College. In 2009, Ms. Ballute was named by the New York Times as a “Teacher Who Makes a Difference.” For 2 years Ms. Ballute has been involved with New Visions for Public Schools, using the Literacy Design Collaborative to incorporate reading and writing into the social studies curriculum.

Jay Blanchard, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Reading Education, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University; Tempe, Arizona; currently Director of Reading, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), Educational Testing Service; Princeton, New Jersey; jsblanchard@ets.org. Dr. Blanchard is a former classroom teacher and the author of numerous books and articles about technology and reading education beginning in 1979 with Computer Applications in Reading. For the last 10 years, he has assisted teachers of language minority and American Indian children with early literacy education through U.S. Department of Education Early Reading First grants. Dr. Blanchard is also a former board member of the International Reading Association.

Devon Brenner, Ph.D., Professor of Reading and Language Arts and head of the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education in the College of Education, Mississippi State University; Mississippi State, Mississippi; devon@ra.msstate.edu. Dr. Brenner’s research focuses on policy and practice in literacy education and teacher education.

Megan C. Brown, Ph.D., Research Scientist and Project Manager, Language and Literacy in High Risk Populations Lab, Georgia State University; Atlanta, Georgia; MBrown151@gsu.edu. Dr. Brown studies the relationships between dialect variation, language knowledge, and literacy using experimental and quantitative methods. Her current research addresses how language disabilities intersect with dialect variation to complicate acquisition of language and literacy skills.

Joanne F. Carlisle, Ph.D., Professor Emerita, School of Education, University of Michigan; Ann Arbor, Michigan; jfcarl@umich.edu. Dr. Carlisle’s research interests include the relation of language and literacy development, effective language and literacy instruction, and professional development for elementary literacy teachers. Her current work focuses on the development of an interactive web-based professional development program (Case Studies of Reading Lessons) and studies of a video analysis system focused on teachers’ support for students’ learning from texts. She oversaw the evaluation of the Reading First program in Michigan and served as coeditor of Elementary School Journal and Learning Disabilities Research and Practice.

Carol McDonald Connor, Ph.D., Senior Learning Scientist, Learning Sciences Institute. Carol Connor is a professor of psychology at Arizona State University and a distinguished research associate at the Florida Center for Reading Research. Her research focuses on examining the links between young children’s language and their literacy development with the goal of illuminating reasons for the perplexing difficulties that children who are atypical and diverse learners have with developing basic and advanced literacy skills. Most recently, her research interests have focused on children’s learning in the classroom—from preschool through fifth grade—and developing technology and interventions to improve teacher efficacy and students’ reading outcomes. Awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2008), the Society for Research in Child Development, Early Career Award (2009), and the Richard Snow Award (APA, 2008), she is the principal investigator for studies funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Institute for Education Sciences, and the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development. She is also Editor of the Journal for Research in Educational Effectiveness (Impact Factor 3.15) and an Associate Editor for Child Development (Impact Factor 4.1).

Lara-Jeane Costa, M.A., Research Specialist, Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; lara-jeane.costa@cidd.unc.edu. Ms. Costa has worked with students with disabilities as a classroom teacher, camp counselor, and clinician. During her graduate studies at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Chapel Hill, she received training as part of the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disorders (LEND) program and Maternal and Child Health Bureau Leadership program. Currently, Ms. Costa is a doctoral candidate in the UNC School of Education, examining the impact of an evidence-based instructional model for students who struggle with written expression.

Paul Deane, Ph.D., Principal Research Scientist in Research and Development, Educational Testing Service (ETS); Princeton, New Jersey; pdeane@ets.org. Dr. Deane’s current research interests include automated essay scoring, vocabulary assessment, and cognitive models of writing skill. During his career at ETS he has worked on a variety of natural language processing and assessment projects, including automated item generation, tools to support verbal test development, scoring of collocation errors, reading and vocabulary assessment, and automated essay scoring. His work currently focuses on the development and scoring of writing assessments for the ETS research initiative, Cognitively Based Assessments for Learning.

Jennifer Lucas Dombek, M.S., Doctoral Candidate in Reading Education and Language Arts, Florida State University; Tallahassee, Florida; jdombek@fcrr.org. Ms. Dombek began working at the Florida Center for Reading Research in 2006, where she is currently an associate in research. While at the Florida Center for Reading Research she has worked on curriculum development, as an interventionist has provided teachers with professional development, and has coordinated multiple research studies with students in various local elementary schools. Her current research interests include grade retention, content area literacy instruction, and the assessment of writing in elementary-age students.

Julie Dwyer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education, Early Childhood Department, Boston University; Boston, Massachusetts; dwyerj@bu.edu. Dr. Dwyer holds an M.Ed. in Language and Literacy from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Language, Literacy, and Culture from the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on early language and literacy learning and teaching. She specializes in conceptual knowledge, vocabulary development, and vocabulary instruction. She is on the editorial board of Reading Research Quarterly. She has published papers in Reading Research Quarterly, Early Childhood Research Quarterly , The Reading Teacher, and Early Childhood Education Journal.

Crystal Edwards, B.A., Research Associate, Carolina Institute of Developmental Disabilities, UNC School of Medicine; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; crystal.edwards@cidd.unc.edu. Ms. Edwards is conducting assessments and interventions for a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences project devoted to using strategy-based interventions for middle school students at risk for writing disabilities.

Steve Graham, Ph.D., is Professor and the Currey-Ingram Chair in Special Education at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. He is the current editor of Exceptional Children and the past editor of Contemporary Educational Psychology. He is the co-author of the Handbook of Learning Disabilities; Making the Writing Process Work: Strategies for Composition and Self-Regulation; Teaching Every Child Every Day: Learning in Diverse Schools and Classrooms; Teaching Every Adolescent Every Day; Spell It-Write (a spelling program for children in grades K through 9); and the upcoming Handbook of Writing Research. Dr. Graham’s research has focused mainly on identifying the factors that contribute to the development of writing difficulties; the development and validation of effective procedures for teaching planning, revising, and the mechanics of writings to struggling writers; and the use of technology to enhance writing performance and development.

Joanna S. Gorin, Ph.D., Director of the Cognitive and Learning Sciences Group, Educational Testing Service; Princeton, New Jersey; jgorin@ets.org. Dr. Gorin’s research interests are in applications of cognitive science principles to assessment design, development, scoring, and validation. She has particular interest in the innovative use of technology to enhance the meaningfulness and instructional utility of educational assessment scores.

Karen Harris, Ed.D., is Professor and the Currey-Ingram Chair in Special Education at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. She has taught kindergarten and fourth-grade students, as well as elementary and secondary students with disabilities. She is co-author, with Steve Graham, of the books Making the Writing Process Work: Strategies for Composition and Self-Regulation; Teaching Every Child Every Day: Learning in Diverse Schools and Classrooms; Handbook of Learning Disabilities; and the curriculum Spell It-Write. Dr. Harris is the editor of the Journal of Educational Psychology. Her research is focused on theoretical and intervention issues in the development of academic and self-regulation strategies among students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, and other challenges.

Stephen R. Hooper, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry, UNC School of Medicine; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; stephen.hooper@cidd.unc.edu. Dr. Hooper is Director of Education and Training at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (CIDD), as well as Director of the CIDD Child and Adolescent Neuropsychology Consultation Service. For more than 25 years he has worked in child neuropsychology, focusing on neurologically based disorders, including children and adolescents with learning disabilities.

Sarah Ingebrand, M.S., developmental psychology graduate student, Florida State University, and Predoctoral Interdisciplinary Research Training Fellow through the Florida Center for Reading Research; Tallahassee, Florida; ingebrand@psy.fsu.edu. Ms. Ingebrand graduated from Northwestern University with a bachelor’s of science in communication sciences and disorders and psychology. She began pursuing her Ph.D. at Florida State, where her research focuses on the development of reading, writing, and spelling skills in older elementary and middle school students. She finished her master’s thesis in the spring of 2013 under her advisor Dr. Carol Connor and will complete her doctoral degree at Arizona State University.

Young-Suk Kim, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, Florida State University; Tallahassee, Florida; ykim@fcrr.org. Dr. Kim is a former classroom teacher in primary and secondary schools and community college in California. Dr. Kim’s research areas involve language and literacy acquisition and instruction, including early literacy predictors; reading fluency and comprehension; and writing for children from various language backgrounds such as English, Korean, and Spanish. Dr. Kim is currently the principal investigator and co-investigator of several studies funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, and the National Institutes of Health.

Julie E. Learned, M.Ed., Doctoral Candidate in Literacy, Language, and Culture in Educational Studies, University of Michigan; Ann Arbor, Michigan; jlearned@umich.edu. Prior to pursuing her degree, Ms. Learned worked as a secondary reading specialist and special education teacher in Seattle-area public schools. Her research examines the role of social, institutional, and instructional contexts in adolescent literacy learning, particularly for youth identified as struggling readers. She holds a master of education in learning and teaching from Harvard University and a master of education in special education from the University of Washington.

Timothy A. Lent, M.A., high school history teacher and curriculum designer; Brooklyn, New York; TLent2@schools.nyc.gov. Mr. Lent started using the Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) tools in the winter of 2011 to integrate the Common Core State Standards into his curriculum. Over the last 3 years, he has led LDC-related professional development sessions in his school, district, and at national conferences. In addition to his participation with the LDC, Mr. Lent is Student Achievement Partners Core Advocate and a New York City Department of Education Common Core Fellow.

Tenaha O’Reilly, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, MS 13E, Princeton, NJ 08541.
Dr. O’Reilly’s research interests are in assessment, reading comprehension, reading strategies, metacognition, and the role of background knowledge in understanding and learning. He is currently involved in projects aimed at designing and evaluating innovative measures of reading comprehension for students in pre-K—12 settings.

P. David Pearson, Ph.D., Professor of Language and Literacy and Human Development, former Dean, School of Education, University of California Berkeley; Berkeley, California; ppearson@berkeley.edu. Dr. Pearson conducts research on reading curriculum, pedagogy, and policy practices in K—12 educational settings. His most recent work focuses on a research and development project in which reading, writing, and language serve as tools to promote the acquisition of knowledge and inquiry skills in science.

Katherine T. Rhodes, M.A., Doctoral Student, Developmental Psychology Program, Georgia State University; Atlanta, Georgia; krhodes1@student.gsu.edu. Ms. Rhodes is a language and literacy fellow with research interests centering on understanding mathematics achievement difficulty as it relates to symbol acquisition, language, reading, assessment biases, and minority achievement disparities. Her current research focuses on children’s linguistic skills as predictors of mathematics performance on standardized achievement assessments.

John P. Sabatini, Ph.D., Principle Research Scientist, Research and Development Division, Global Assessment Center, Educational Testing Service. Dr. Sabatini’s research interests and expertise are in reading literacy development and disabilities, assessment, and educational technology. He is lead editor of two books on innovation in reading comprehension assessment and is currently the principal investigator of a grant to develop pre-K—12 comprehension assessments. He also serves as co-investigator on projects that explore the reading processes of adolescents, English language learners, and students with reading-based disabilities.

Yi Song, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Cognitive and Learning Sciences Group, Educational Testing Service; Princeton, New Jersey; ysong@ets.org. Dr. Song’s research interests and expertise are in the field of argumentation, including argumentative writing, argumentation learning progressions, and argumentation strategies. Currently, she is collaborating closely with researchers, assessment development staff, and classroom teachers to validate argumentation learning progressions, to develop formative assessments aligned to the progressions, and to create teacher support materials.

Dorothy S. Strickland, Ph.D., Samuel DeWitt Proctor Professor of Education, Emerita, Rutgers University; New Brunswick, New Jersey; dorothy.strickland@gse.rutgers.edu. Dr. Strickland is the former president of the International Reading Association and Reading Hall of Fame. She received the International Reading Association’s Outstanding Teacher Educator of Reading Award, the National-Louis University Ferguson Award for Outstanding Contributions to Early Childhood Education, and the William S. Gray Citation of Merit. She served on the Common Core State Standards Validation Committee. Her publications include Essential Readings on Early Literacy, Literacy Leadership in Early Childhood, Bridging the Literacy Achievement Gap: 4—12, and Administration and Supervision of Reading Programs.

Jacquelyn M. Urbani, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Special Education, Dominican University of California; San Rafael, California; jacquelyn.urbani@dominican.edu. Dr. Urbani completed her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley in human development and special education. Her interests in literacy achievement began when she was a teacher at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, where she taught for 12 years. She is also interested in pre-and in-service teacher education and is currently engaged in research exploring the roles of doctoral programs and hiring institutions in developing quality educators. Specifically, she is examining the features of institutions that assist in developing content and pedagogical knowledge across disciplines.

Sarah Vanselous, B.A., Research Associate, Carolina Institute of Developmental Disabilities, UNC School of Medicine; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; sarah.vanselous@cidd.unc.edu. Ms. Vanselous is conducting assessments and intervention for a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences project devoted to using strategy-based interventions for middle school students at risk for writing disabilities.

Richard K. Wagner, Ph.D., Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Research Professor of Psychology and W. Russell and Eugenia Morcom Chair, Florida State University; Tallahassee, Florida; rkwagner@psy.fsu.edu. Dr. Wagner also is a cofounder and the current associate director of the Florida Center for Reading Research. He earned a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Yale University in 1985. He previously earned a master’s degree in school psychology from the University of Akron. His major areas of research interest are dyslexia and the normal acquisition of reading. He currently is the principal investigator of the Multidisciplinary Learning Disability Center funded by NICHD.

Julie A. Washington, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders, Georgia State University, 30 Pryor Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30302

Julie Washington is a professor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Program at Georgia State University. She holds a joint appointment also in Developmental Psychology and is an affiliate faculty member in the Georgia Board of Regents’ initiative, Research on the Challenges of Acquiring Language and Literacy, a unique research initiative focused on both child and adult learners. Her work focuses on cultural dialect use in African American children, with a specific emphasis on the impact of dialectal variation on language assessment, literacy attainment, and academic performance. She is currently examining the role of cultural-linguistic variation and social factors on diagnosis of reading disabilities in African American students growing up in urban poverty.

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